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since 1976. >> host: but as an example of fair use today? >> guest: . system are students everywhere, when they quote a scholar or encyclopedia of wikipedia or any other source in their paper. they get to use those words as a result of. journalists do every day when they see the report said this, quote, they're able to the materials. >> host: because the source? >> guest: now, although it is always a polite thing to do to give credit to people, but many examples where you would -- you never need to give credit to be within the copyright law. you would make people upset if he did it frequently. but any kind of collage artist makes, for instance, uses materials from different places and doesn't necessarily cite it. documentarians use copyrighted material inevitably all the way through their work because the world we live in is largely copyrighted due to the fact that in 1986. jamaican anesthetists interview? they are copyrighted for 70 years after your test. >> host: why? >> guest: copyright terms had been extended dramatically. fair use is so important these days, precisely because th
to discuss her most recent book reclaiming fair use a primer on properly using copper repeat copyright material in the world everything is copyrighted. this is a little over 15 minutes. >> patricia aufderheide as the author of reclaiming ferret used to put balance back in a copyright. university chicago press. professor aufderheide, what is fair use? >> the right to use other people's material without permission under some circumstances. >> host: where did that term come from? >> guest: it's part of law and it's been a part of the common law since 1841. and as a copyright act since 1976. >> host: what's an example of fair use today? >> guest: it is done by students everywhere when they quote a scholar or an encyclopedia or her wikipedia or any other source. they get to use it as a result of fair use. journalists do it everyday when they say the think-tank report said this no, actually sourcing doesn't have anything to you do it fair use although it is a polite thing to do to give credit to people, but many examples you never need to give credit to be within the copyright law. you would
for samsung. mr. steel, if you would, just begin by giving us a snapshot of the samsung corporation. >> guest: so samsung is now the largest technology company in the world by sales. we cover all the way from components like semiconductor chips and flat panel displays all the way through to finished goods like home appliances, it'sing and smartphones -- televisions and smartphones. so you'll see a whole range of products at the booth where we're sewing pcs, audio systems, home appliances, televisions, the whole range. >> host: what is your position at samsung as executive vice president? for what are you responsible? >> guest: so i'm responsible for our corporate strategy in north america, covering the united states and canada, and then looking at all of our corporate strategies across -- [inaudible] so overseeing all the different product areas and how we put together strategies there, that's my responsibility. >> host: you spent quite a few years in korea, correct? >> guest: that's right. just over ten years. >> host: and why are you now in the states? >> guest: probably they got tired of m
executive vice president of strategy for samsung. mr. steel begin by giving us a snapshot of the samsung corporation. >> guest: samsung is now the largest technology company in the world by sale. we cover all the way from components like your chips at and all the way through finished goods like appliances, televisions and smart phones so you will see a whole range of products here at the booths where we are showing audio systems and televisions in the whole range of electronic products. >> host: what is your position at samsung as executive vice president? what are you responsible for quest. >> guest: i am responsible for north america covering the united states and canada and looking at all the strategies so overseeing all the different products areas and how we put together strategies. >> host: you spend quite a few years in korea correct? >> guest: that's right. >> host: why are you now understates? >> guest: it's very interesting when you abandon the headquarters, you have seen what it is to have global responsibility when looking at a narrower product line but now i'm coming to the
demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
the mississippi where they used to drive the logs in the old lumbering days, and the trails where the pioneers came north. saw some good bass jumping in the river. i never knew anything about the upper mississippi before, and it is really a very beautiful country and there are plenty of dozens and ducks in the fall. but not as many as in idaho and i hope we will both be back there shortly and can joke about our hospital experiences together. best always to you, old timer, from your good friend who misses you very much, mr. papa. ps, best to all the family. am feeling fine and very cheerful about things in general, and hope to see you all soon. papa. no one knows for sure, but these seem to be the last real senses ernest hemingway sat down on paper. amid so much ruin, still the beauty. thank you very much. [applause] >> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback. twitter.com/booktv. >> author jared diamond is next on booktv. he talks about what we can learn from traditional societies that exist in only a very few places around the world today but he also reflects on which people lived f
thought was good for us all. i am honored to be here with american enterprise institute and for me it's like coming to the mac and the promised land and certainly we recognize the great contributions that the american enterprise is given over many years in helping us with the development of policy and understanding of what's taking place particularly here in washington d. c., so thanks for the invitation to come here and speak. we are going to talk about health care today and from a utah perspective, my view of the world when it comes to health care. it's a complicated topic and it's certainly an important topic and i know health care has been on the lips of many, the watercooler topic that it may be. i have heard the story of the four country surgeons in utah talking about health care issue and they got into the conversation of who is the easiest person to operate on? and the one doctor says i can tell you the easiest people to operate on a really mathematicians. when asked why mathematicians come to when you open them up and take them apart all of their parts are numbered so it's ve
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
neglect them. we've got 15 members and they are rotating in us at the other things that the u.n., these rotations that generally speaking, not contentious because they rotate on a fixed and geographic basis. they are sort of an order, so there's not as much fighting as you might think maybe over membership. it is important to understand we do require a vote not just of the p5, but you've got to get a supermajority of the 15 members of the apartment to agree for security council action to go forward. so it's not just a case to block anything, but they don't have the ability to make anything they like happened. the u.n. is quite possibly the most recognized and makes the department of defense leclair by comparison. >> host: what is the effect of ms.? what is the general assembly and is a defective? >> guest: the general assembly of the meeting place above the nations. everybody has one vote. everybody has the police. you see this every year when the world leaders line up at the opening of the u.n. years, in september they each make their speech. the good part of it is the place
access like over here. i know this is hard to see with the light, the unite the will to use our copies that we have been back afterwards. .. they also would benefit from having their revenue source to do a lot more, so this is a wonderful that you can use. let's see, this is another prop that shows carbon energy efficiency spending relative to the carbon intensity that would show you might be spending a bit of money on energy efficiency but you have the carbon intensive energy sources in your state. what are the spaces that fall into that particular squadron, and that might be other candidates for energy efficiency programs. all right with. moving along. this is an example of how you have the comparison interface that the tool allows you to do. this is an interactive feature. so, for example, you hear that the epa is moving forward on greenhouse gases and that it's very receptive to the alternative means of achieving compliance. what would you want to do? with the market base things that you want to do? this particular tool would allow you to look at for example the benefits of
center for mathematical progress. and we are delighted to have david goldhill join us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. what i think of to challenges of blind spots that conservatives have had on health care the first is that it tends to be liberals who criticize and critique our health care system largely because of the large on injured population and the reflexive intuitive response of conservatives have been to say the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system in the world would. don't mess with it, don't change it. the second blind spot in general and in health care is that we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with the charts and data and charts and the data are important. but a lot of times with the way the liberals have one argument is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child that is born with cystic fibrosis and how the child can't get health insurance. these
to go visit. [laughter] >> by the way, when september 11 came, all of us, i think not just in new york but the entire world were riveted to the news, and one of the journalist was interviewing a woman from the midwest who said to the reporter, you know, i've been watching the events in new york, and those people are just like us. [laughter] >> i bet some of you have said that about new yorkers. [laughter] >> that moment made me realize many things. one, that all the unhappiness of september 11, september 11, there was one sliver of sunshine, and it was in the way that americans came together. and it didn't matter what background we had or where we were from. we stood together as a nation. that was really important lesson, but it also has made me realize when i was writing this book i wanted people to see the slice of my life that was different than theirs. now, i doubt the my experience as a reporter region in new york is identical to the experience of mexicans in texas, or identical to the experience of other immigrant groups in different parts of the united states or the world. but w
better not slimed us. they had released the chemicals down to battalion levels, we knew that. anybody over there who we were threatening could have retaliated with chemical weapons. so it was, again, there's so many levels. you listen to this, listen, for all you cadets better here, thank you for coming. because the levels of interacting here today has been just unbelievable. you've got what the president was thinking about, what he was doing, all these different levels, and then i was just out there, you know, at the end, you know, point, you know, tell me what to do, boss. >> i will jump in as the boss. [laughter] and i say thank you very much to dr. engel. [applause] general house. [applause] >> i happened to be on the trip that you saw highlighted in this video with the president and mrs. bush went to saudi arabia to see the troops before the ground war started. and the white house staff was trained to use gas masks and put on clothing. so we were very concerned about the use of chemicals and very bad things. with that, you are about to have some very good things. if you would ple
of people still in the world who do not have those benefits but for those of us that are lucky right now we are within ten years or 20 years of our ancestors so now the question is can you face aging head on and do something about the deterioration 50's, 60's, 70's and on up, can you do anything about that that would give us another to come 20, 30, 40 years or more. and my story's main character likes to argue if we can extend a little faster than we are doing now faster than the deterioration and essentially fervor. >> turn-of-the-century but when that money at or the 19th and that the 20th century what was life expectancy, about 40 years? >> in the 20th century it think it was 47, 48 years average life now we are out to about 80 years so an enormous gains in the last century. estimate how we get to a thousand? [laughter] >> well i have to say before we talk about how to get to a thousand years that there are two questions. there is can we and should we. can we -- we really want to and i think both of those questions are complicated. there is the philosophical side, the bio ethical questio
would have thought when some of us voted for just a common market all those years ago that the eu would now be interfering potentially and what benefits we should be paying two romanians and bulgarians before they have made any occupation to our society? is it any wonder people feel disillusioned and callous? but isn't the good news is, who is more likely to vote to give people a genuine choice of a referendum, a liberal or a conservative or eastland? >> well, i'm delighted by my honorable friend managed to slip the point in at the end. i won't urge any i will friends to make their way to support the reelection and the campaign. but the point, the point that he makes is very important, which is we need to look through every aspect of how we welcome people to our country, and make sure why we must to be fair, we must not be a soft touch. so i am making sure we look at our health service, we look at housing, we look at benefits. with that illegally, we look at all other things and make sure proper and tough controls of people who want to come and live here. >> the treasury was required to
there in that video this morning. they have the capability to be held and used to produce rapid fire. i asked a question on month ago, what purpose does serve in civilians hands are on the street. i haven't received an answer yet but they did blurt the second amendment. 2nd amendment. it wasn't about the 2nd amendment. i defend the second amendment. and i want to see that upheld and regulated and it hasn't been. when that was written on most 300 years ago we didn't have the weapons we have today in the technology. they had muskets and cannons. i think it was 1934 when the ban was put on machine guns, the regulation. we haven't had a mass killing with a machine gun since. i feel these so-called assault weapons that have certain characteristics should fall in that category and be banned. >> thank you mr. heslin, thank you very much. at one point steinbeck had to write a small paragraph that said basically, people are asking what happened. this was after his wife joined him in seattle and when he says we get is not charlie and john. and somebody must have said tim hey where's charlie? yes disapp
to the industry. >> my last question if i could use, you know, just 1% or 2%, and it's not as much understanding of agriculture and you always read about food prices going not. speak to me as best you can with direct correlation there is between consumer prices and problems of drought in which causes the price to go up? >> i get this all the time because people often talk about commodity prices as food prices. you're a very long way away from a plate of food that you might purchase. most of that, for some products obviously the difference between a farm level price and the retail price is closer. for things like corn, you look at what goes into an animal that then gets process and sold as meat to consumers. if you look at the retail food dollar we spend, that's about 14 cents. they are small impacts on agriculture is not to say they aren't significant. if you look at 2007, 2008, the most recent period 2011, 2012, and my testimony surcharge on that with the monthly inflation rates looking at the year before to the change from december 2012 b.c. 2011. you can see we've come down to a low level of
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
into questions that is going on with our activists all over the country today. why don't you pick us off. >> sure. good morning, everyone. what an amazing energy in this room come as a thank you for being part of it and giving us the opportunity to share comments with you. i really think it is actually simpler then everyone makes the scene. i have never ever met a member of congress, house or senate, that did not want to make our country healthier, better, stronger for the future. we can figure out a way to get there. that is what this is about. putting the country first and doing what are country does every day, working together to get the job done. with this audience you will pull your members of congress and encourage them to join this group and to start solving the problems of the greatest nation in the world. gabba suing think you for having a survey. [applause] >> good morning. i represent connecticut's fourth congressional district. this system might think, one of the most diverse congressional districts in the country. i have the town's of greenwich where hedge fund managers and corporate
it seems to me, and maybe i will direct us to the navy, because the numbers matter in the navy. obviously it is a lot of great people. we have half as many chips as we had 30 years ago. some people say that that is okay because they are technologically advanced we don't need as many. which i am sure that that is true in part. but it does seem like numbers matter to a certain extent. that is the thrust of my question. we are asking you, the navy, to do a lot of things. to go and chase the pirates off the coast of samarra. we are asking you to send humanitarian aid from the caribbean and citizen destroyers and we will need to keep an eye on china as well. it seems like the world has not gotten safer. the question to the navy and the other services, three simple questions. how do you decide the priorities that you are asked by the combatant commanders. these different missions. how do you make that decision in terms i priority when you only have limited access? also, are there areas of the world where cousins will be decreased because of this? and also, most importantly, what impact does thi
think use it will find the subject fascinating. [laughter] i'm going to talk about growing older in traditional societies. this subject is just one chapter of my "latest book which compares traditional small societies with our big bottom society with respect to many aspects of society, such as growing old, bringing up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
that separates us we feel your support freedom for feminist and self expression and a big exclamation point as all around the. >> working on this book has been interesting from brooklyn to moscow the conversations about pussy riot the same topic comes up. so many say i of for somebody's speaking against oppression or fundamentalism but was this superbly it making a performance is in a church? what i have realized over time is yes this is the way social change happens never about power and justice because of a higher consciousness is about people being willing to act out, be inappropriate when they're not supposed to and it is important to buy the book and support policy rise in material ways to understand their message more deeply then how each of us stand up as often as possible. tonight joining me is some of my favorite artists and writers who are famously inappropriate and speak out of turn and i am so grateful to them to be a part of this project and book. i want them to come up and joining me here to start our program. [applause] we're going to do a brief enactment of the court room be
, center for medical progress. and we are delighted to have david gold hill join us this afternoon. for a talk about his new book, "catastrophic care: how american health care killed my father - and how we can fix it." i think that there's two, when i think about health care i think of to challenges of blind spots that i think conservatives have on health care. the first is that it tends to be liberals who criticize the critique our health care system, largely because of the large uninsured population. and the response is to say the health care system is just fine, it's the best health care system in the world, don't mess with it, don't change it. i think the second blind spot as conservatives in general but certainly in health care is that we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically, or with charts and data. charts and data are important. but a lot of times the we liberals have one argument is by talking about a single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her, or the child who was born with cystic fibrosis, and how that
to the federal government used to pay unemployment benefits to nevadans who are out of work. this will stabilize the rate paid by businesses and insure that the entire amount is paid off by 2016. [applause] >> we will also work on project neon, a project that will meet the most critical transportation needs of southern nevada. project neon is perhaps the largest public works project in nevada since the construction of hoover dam. [applause] it will completely modernize the infrastructure of the grid and insure that our commute is safer and more efficient for decades to come. [applause] nevada must continue to lead in other ways, and no opportunity is as rich with promise as our primary industry, gaming. nevada was the first state to legalize and regulate online gaming. in the absence of federal action on this issue, nevada must continue to lead. the nevada gaming control board will bring legislation to eliminate nevada's statutory barriers to interstate online poker and ask for authority to enter into interstate agreements. nevada has always been the gold standard of both gaming regulation and o
: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cure's global women's cancer summit. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president, but she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inaug
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
, william smith, and patricia brady. please let us know about the book fair and post them to our wall at booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. author jared diamond talks about his book and the way people live in human existence. what we can learn from traditional societies. >> i would like to invite doctor diamond to the stage. please give him a warm welcome to the seminar. [cheers] [applause] >> let me first check if you can see be okay. can you hear me in the back? it is a great pleasure to be back in philadelphia today and back and this wonderful library to talk about a subject other than gall bladders. [laughter] >> to give me an idea how many may find what i'm about to tell you a practical value. please reason into one of the other of two questions are lasker the first is, could you raise your hand if you are over age 65 years old or hope to live past age 65? or have a parent or grandparent over 65 years old red many of you, all right. the second group, please raise your hand if you are under 65 and have no intention living past 65 and do not have a parent or grandparent pass
have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without the collaboration of the committee of the colleagues in order to do that in 2013, and example of the
of focus enables us to have that perspective in a different way than if we were running a television network for if we were focusing on a larger more diverse demographic. >> for no wonder if you could address the opportunities you see on the horizon in engaging in a public audience is whether it is the next iteration of crowd sourcing or whatever it is, what better way is you see to engage the audience in ways that intersect in the to double lines that you've described that have impact both on your social consequence as well as your sustainability but it begins with ways to engage them in the journalism. estimate what we are trying to do from the editorial perspective is go to their readers rather than create new products that ask them to come to us. so being very much engaged in a conversation particularly on twitter and some extent facebook is an important strategic priority for what we are doing. we are also experimenting with ideas of trying to use the technology to engage in those dialogues in a way that hasn't been possible something like google hangout there's about 25 folks i
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
and our great leader, tom vilsack has an opportunity to share with us visions for were going in the second term. it seems like a sequester come to sequester come to sequester and that certainly does weigh heavily on our shoulders, but nevertheless come were applied rumor going to do some incredibly great things in the second turned and i'm sure he's very excited to share that with you. i also want to recognize that we have a lot of young people in the audience from the outlook forum student diversity program, now in its seventh year. 20 undergraduates and for the first time, 10 graduate students are here to gain insights into food monoculture. so be sure to seek them out during the breaks. congratulate them for being here, mentor them over the course of a couple of days. that would be great. i know how these people are because i have an alumnus of this program who works in my office and these are the people who are going to beat american agriculture in the future. many thanks to our program partner, university of maryland eastern shore and the sponsors to make this program possible, chs, f
how china will surpass us. he said that in the florida senate in 2011 and how we need each other. but that's diplomacy comest you can get a bit of a pass. senator hagel, key was had by the executive commission on china, but talk solely about development issues. rule of law and economic growth is fine. but that's not the job he's getting. he said absolutely nothing about the rise of china. he's also said absolutely nothing about he has had the defense department is going to do with the rise of china in an era of budget cuts to the defense department he supports. it's very troubling, fred has a great way of putting this consensus reality that in a sense it doesn't matter. so did not do the job better and you can take that for granted. japan for the first time in a decade has not just her and run defense budget, modestly $1.6 billion increase. it would be nice to see it continue, but everyone watches very carefully to see the leading indicator, which is us and what we're willing to do. taiwan is a country rushing to the exit to make sure nothing comes between it and china and theref
on the applicants is important. using technology to verify claims that people make. i agree wholeheartedly that there cannot be a strict confidentiality provision in this. that's a dealbreaker. we can't prosecute all benefits fraud, so we have to have the ability to let an administrative process play out with those cases that are not going to go to yes attorney or be prosecuted by i speak we have to let uscis use its authority and tools like administrative removal to make sure that the people who are denied are not allowed to stay here anyway. that is a huge weakness and benefits programs right now. these are not small numbers of people that are benefiting from the fact that we tolerate so much fraud in this process. >> thank you. >> indifference -- let me be very brief. in the report published by immigration enforcement, we did identify gaps. one of the biggest gaps i think is frankly the either of my program about the fraudulent identification. that we do not have where we can say to the person ocean front of him or her is the person that the verification practices. we need to drasticall
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
and around tax time i get very upset when i'm being questioned in a very inhumane way. so if i use many drivers license, i'm okay. when i pop a sierra leone passport, all of a sudden big problem. i'm the same guy, same people at the same area. it's almost like there's no human interaction at all. and if you try valid information from people for security reasons, you can actually get more than if you're inhumane to them. so it's always quite fascinating to see what the reaction is. every time i enter, i came back from geneva that every time i come back ims questions, but i find the questions incredibly funny. one of them was that i just arrived in the guy asked me, so where were you? is a geneva. he said how long? at the two, days. why reengineered a short time? i only had a few days to do my work. why? i don't know, this is how it was. while you're traveling with a small but? because i was gone for two, three days. but through my backpack and when you travel so many places? because of my work. eventually i say is that there were 10 years, it was like where? would be done in the question
people really do talk about -- they use that kind of exercise language that i use in the book, you know, you need mental calisthenics as well as physical ones to kind of keep your mind healthy, and that apparently can be helpful in dealing with alzheimer's and things like that, so there may well be a prescription of video games we may want to dole out to senior citizens. ok. good. all right. >> called everything bad is good for you, agree, disagree, the book is there for you to read and debate. and we ..ncoming out. [applause] >> are you going to stay around? >> stick around, we are going to sign. >> is that where i >> next on the tv, trevor aaronson says since 9/11 the fbi has built up a network of over 15,000 informant and muslim communities around the u.s. he argues these informants spearhead phony terror plots which are then exposed by the fbi with great fanfare to make it look like the was doing a good job of keeping us safe. mr. aaronson is joined by coadjutor mother jones magazine. this is in our 15. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out. trevor and i spend a lot of time
and it was time for us to become a colony again. they were winning that war, marching up the eastern seaboard destroys city after city, destroyed washington, d.c., burned down the white house. next stop, baltimore but as they came into the chesapeake bay, the armada of ships, warships a source of the eye could see, it was looking grim. fort mchenry standing right there. general armistead who was in charge of fort mchenry had a large american flag commission to fly in front of the fort. the admiral in charge of the british fleet was offended and said take that flag down. you have until dusk until you take that flag and but if you don't we will reduce you to ashes. there was a young amateur poet on board by the name of francis scott key, sent by president madison to try to obtain the release of an american physician who was being held captive. he overheard the british plans they were not going to let them off the ship. he mourned as dusk approached. he more for his fledgling young nation. and as the sun set, then bartman's, missiles, so much debris, he strained trying to see was the flag still
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we had john from day -- daily show helped us. and nothing is better except being in a book store on a friday night. so i pity all of us, really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all, it will be the most important thing i'll say all night, and thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downtown hill, and some of the specific thank yous to the end. we're here too talk about "fifth assassin." and people ask me where the book came from. no one gets crazeyear e-mail than me. no one gets more proof that abraham lincoln is gay than me. the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the -- i have to ask first. not here? then let's talk about him. here's what happens. i'm not dish promise you this is true. i was standing right of the and he comes top me early and says, brad, you want to see he holy grail? and he ah has crazy eyes and i'm like, you brought the holy gra
is moving in in strange ways. it used to be said that books were written for the general reader. now they're written by the general reader. .. eager to join in dialogue about where we as a nation find ourselves in this drive towards freedom and it seems particularly fitting that we would have this conversation today, the day after the nation paused its daily business to pay tribute to reverend martin luther king, jr.'s life and legacy. and it seems fitting that we would have this conversation the day after the nation's first black president was sworn in for his second term. i know much of the nation has already moved on, and president obama's rhetoric about the promise of america, life, liberty, justice, equality for all has already been forgotten by many, and i know that many people in america will not think of dr. king again until his holiday rolls around again next year. but i would like to us to pause to night and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach the nation's present. it seems important to do that given that this year marks
complex issue, because of the definition of taxes, penalties and related issues. >> yeah, i think using the term subsidy by its nature, it makes people nervous. subsidy seems have sort of a connotation use in recent years of something untoward. i guess the way i would look at it, i hear your question as a bit of a philosophical question, and less of a nuts and bolts question. i think philosophically, there is fairly broad agreement that you subsidize things that have a social benefit. that they have a benefit that goes beyond the individual and it's not decision reflected in the marketplace. and so i think that you have to look at it that way, if something is not being valued that would make, you know, society better, then you have to come up with some way of evaluating it. whether tax is one way of doing that. i think as far as a market mechanism, it is the way we have tended to look at subsidy as sort of the lubricant to allow these new technologies to find their footing in the marketplace. they do, without a doubt. we have our technology curve and i can show you the map of all of our
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